Childhood Obesity

Overview

Childhood Obesity is a worldwide problem that is rapidly growing in the U.S. According to an article by Rush-Wilson one in six children is obese causing "a projected life expectancy that is shorter than that of their parents." (Rush-Wilson 3). This is a huge issue that causes many to wonder who to blame? Two contributors that often get a lot of the blame are children's schools and their parents.

According to an article by Maher, the blame is often but on families. (Maher 305). One reason that parents are blamed is because children learn habits from their parents. Also, because parents are the caregivers, they are expected to limit a child's portions and provide them with healthy food to eat. (Maher 307). In an economy where it is tough to make ends meet, often parents neglect the nutrition that they provide for their children, going for cheaper options that may hurt their kids in the long run. (Maher 313).

In an article by Rush-Wilson, cultural factors, such as schools, can play a role in childhood obesity. (Rush-Wilson 4). Sugary beverages that are available in school cafeterias and vending machines may only add to the unhealthy caloric intake of children. (Samples 66). According to Greenblatt, many schools have dropped recess or physical education courses, taking away a chance for children to get exercise and learn good habits. (Greenblatt 77). Another issue with schools is that cafeterias are allowing fast-food and other unhealthy foods to be options for student's lunches. Schools are depending on Soda-companies for funding for sports teams and music groups, this can also be a contributing factor in childhood obesity. (Greenblatt 79). Also, schools along with parents should help to educate children about being active and eating healthy.

History

Analysis
Childhood obesity is a serious problem that our current generation must prioritize.It needs to be addressed by utilizing parents as health promoters.Parents can be either the problem or the solution , it depends of whether they encourage healthy or unhealthy eating habits to their children. Children imitate parents and the extent to which parents eat healthy foods and exercise should predict the behavior of their children. In order to encourage healthy eating, parents are recommended to keep fresh fruits in a bowl within the child's reach to grab, cooking more vegetables, taking walks with the family after dinner, and turning off the TV during dinner time(Ogden 245).Parents may encourage unhealthy eating habits by just being present when the child eats (Kyle et al 96). found that overweight children took larger bites of food, ate faster than non overweight children, and increased their eating speed at the end of meal but only when the mother was present. When the mother was not present, overweight children did not differ from normal weight children in their eating behavior. Also parents felt less able to provide their children with vegetables because of their own and children's busy schedules. Lack of time and the family or child being away from home may be a relevant predictor of whether the parents provide their child with vegetables and other healthy food options. In addition, parents may think that healthy eating will not have a significant impact on weight loss or maintenance, leading them to place more weight on genetics or other factors and less on nutrition and diet. This belief could be especially prominent given the high number of obese adults in America and the high numbers of Americans who attempt unsuccessful diets every year. As such, some parents may view providing healthy foods as an action unlikely to keep their children from becoming overweight.

Works Cited
Kyle R, Andrews, Kami S,Silk, and Ihuoma U Eneli.Parents as Health Promoters:"A Theory of Planned behavior Perspective on the Prevention of Childhood Obesity".2010. 15:95-107. web.18 Feb.2011.
Greenblatt, Alan. "Obesity Epidemic Can Americans Change their Self-destructive Habits?." CQ Researcher 31 Jan 2003: 73-98. Web. 22 Feb 2011.

Maher, JaneMaree, Suzanne Fraser, and Jo Lindsay. "Provisioning and Consuming?: Children, Mothers and 'Childhood obesity'." Health Sociology Review 19.3 (2010): 304-316. Web. 22 Feb 2011.

Ogden Cl, Carroll,MD, Curtin Lr, Lamb MM, Fleming KM."Prevalence of high body mass index in US children and adolescents,2007-2010. Jama(3):242-249.web.18 Feb 2011.

Rush-Wilson, Tiffany C. "The Crisis of Childhood Obesity: What You Can Do." Pediatrics for Parents 24.1 (2007): 3-5. Web. 22 Feb 2011.

Samples, Evangeline Y. "Childhood Obesity Are Schools the Problem or the Solution?." American Fitness Nov 2010: 66-67. Web. 22 Feb 2011

Resources

Greenblatt, Alan. "Obesity Epidemic Can Americans Change their Self-destructive Habits?." CQ Researcher 31 Jan 2003: 73-98. Web. 22 Feb 2011.
In this article, obesity is examined on a larger scale throughout the whole nation. One issue that is brought to light is that of childhood obesity. Childhood obesity is a concern for the health of our future and different medical complications that may arise. Schools are also explored as a factor adding to the issue because of its decrease in physical activities and increase in fatty foods. The article finishes by offering some solutions to this growing problem.

Maher, JaneMaree, Suzanne Fraser, and Jo Lindsay. "Provisioning and Consuming?: Children, Mothers and 'Childhood obesity'." Health Sociology Review 19.3 (2010): 304-316. Web. 22 Feb 2011.
This article examines the relationship between children and their parents and the contributing problems in childhood obesity. Also, consumerism is examined as another problem that is adding to the epidemic. The article argues that parents need to provision food and set limits and most importantly, good examples

Rush-Wilson, Tiffany C. "The Crisis of Childhood Obesity: What You Can Do." Pediatrics for Parents 24.1 (2007): 3-5. Web. 22 Feb 2011.
This article discusses different issues caused by childhood obesity and provides some solutions to fighting childhood obesity. The article also goes into different eating disorders and the problems they cause. Overall, this article is a helpful resource by providing real solutions to the overeating and getting active. Ideas as simple as planning out meals and cooking with your children can help teach better habits for the future.

Samples, Evangeline Y. "Childhood Obesity Are Schools the Problem or the Solution?." American Fitness Nov 2010: 66-67. Web. 22 Feb 2011.
This article gives current facts and statistics about childhood obesity. The main focus of the article is to discuss the connection between childhood obesity and schools. Everything from school lunches to sugary drinks in vending machines is noted, and possible changes are given to help this growing problem. The article also points out that although schools are somewhat responsible, there are many other factors contributing to childhood obesity.